Linux

Video: Linus Torvalds, Where is Linux Going

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LinuxCon 2013 Europe was this week... and videos from it have started being published. Here's a video with our favorite Linux leader about the future of the Linux kernel. Enjoy!

Oh, and here is the Kernel Developer Panel

Video: The Linux Way

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I saw this mentioned on the Fedora Planet. Andy Grover gives a presentation on The Linux Way and how while it is based on The Unix Way, it has been updated for a new era. The real content starts about 4 minutes into it. Enjoy!

Videos: KVM Forum 2011 Presentations

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The KVM Forum 2011 was held at the Hyatt Regency in Vancouver, Canada on August 15-16. It was co-located with LinuxCon North America 2011.

LinuxCon and the KVM Forum were both sponsored by The Linux Foundation who recorded a large number of videos from both events. Unfortunately, The Linux Foundation had few security breaches to deal with on their kernel.org and linux.com domains which (I'm guessing) has greatly delayed them doing post-production work on the recordings and posting them publicly.

I found that Red Hat had recently posted a handful of the KVM Forum videos to YouTube but since they were only available in the flv and mp4 formats, I decided to re-encode them and post them to archive.org as webm (a free, open source, non-patent encumbered video format). I think archive.org is really a better place for them. Red Hat released them under a Creative Commons, Attribution - No Derivative Works 3.0 License. I have not altered the videos in any way other than re-encoding them to webm in a smaller resolution (624x352) and bitrate (664Kbit) making them one half to one third of the original filesize yet maintaining reasonable quality. Modern Firefox, Google Chrome, and Opera browsers can play webm as can stand-alone players like VLC, Totem, and mplayer.

They are all highly technical presentations for those interested in the nitty-gritty details of the Linux KVM virtualization Hypervisor. I have embedded the first, short keynote video below and given download URLs for the rest. Thanks to Red Hat for posting them!

One thing to note is that the camera / recording is statically positioned and does not show the presenter slides so I have also included the links to the slide decks in PDF format. For a better understanding, you are strongly encouraged to look at the slides while watching the videos. Also be warned that some presenters may occasionally use curse words.

Here's a zip file containing all slide decks in PDF format for all of the presentations.

Alexander Graf - AHCI Doing Storage right 105 MB / PDF
Allen Kay, Intel - Intel Graphics Virtualization on KVM 57.3 MB / PDF
Alon Levy, Red Hat - SPICE Roadmap 88.9 MB / PDF
Andrew Theurer, IBM - Improving the Out-of-box Performance When Using KVM 210.9 MB / PDF
Anthony Liguori, IBM Linux Technology Center - Keynote Address Day 2 43.1 MB / PDF
Anthony Liguori, IBM Technology Center - Code Generation for Fun and Profit 128.7 MB / PDF
Asias He, Beihang University - Native Linux KVM tool 113.1 MB / PDF
Avi Kivity, Red Hat - Keynote Address, Day 1 36.9 MB / PDF
Avi Kivity, Red Hat - Performance Monitoring for KVM Guests 148.4 MB / PDF
Bryan Cantrill, VP Engineering, Joyent - Experiences Porting KVM to SmartOS 199.1 MB / PDF
Conrad Wood, ProfitBricks - Geographically distributed HPC Clouds using KVM 119.8 MB / PDF
Dan Kenigsberg, Red Hat - VDSM is now Free 145.2 MB / PDF
Daniel Berrange, Red Hat - Introduction to libvirt APIs for KVM 160.5 MB / PDF
Gerd Hoffmann, Red Hat - Fixing the USB disaster 148.4 MB / PDF
Jagane Sundar - Livebackup - Full and Incremental Disk Backups of Running VMs 136.2 MB / PDF
Jan Kiszka, Siemens AG - Using KVM as a Real-Time Hypervisor 132.6 MB / PDF
Kevin Wolf, Red Hat - The Reinvention of qcow2 148.1 MB / PDF
Lucas Meneghel Rodrigues, Red Hat - Making KVM autotest useful for KVM developers 152.1 MB / PDF
Marcelo Tosatti, Red Hat - QEMU: live block copy 72.4 MB / PDF
Mark Wagner, Red Hat - KVM Performance Improvements and Optimizations 107.3 MB / PDF
Markus Armbruster, Red Hat - QEMU's device model qdev 59.1 MB / PDF
Michael S. Tsirkin, Red Hat - Virtio Networking Status Update 86.2 MB / ODP
Paul Lu, University of Alberta - Low-Latency, High-Bandwidth Use Cases for Nahanni/ivshmem 149.5 MB / PDF
Paul Mackerras, IBM LTC Ozlabs - KVM on the IBM POWER7 Processor 164.5 MB / PDF
Ricardo M. Matinata, IBM Linux Technology Center - Implementing a Hardware Appliance 188.4 MB / PDF
Rik van Riel, Red Hat - Guest Memory Overcommit: Free page hinting & more 106.0 MB / PDF
Ryan Harper, IBM Linux Technology Center - Keep a Limit On It: IO Throttling in QEMU 89.7 MB / PDF
Stefan Hajnoczi, IBM & Paolo Bonzini, Red Hat - Virtio SCSI: An alternative virtualized storage stack for KVM 142.2 MB / PDF
Stuart Yoder, Freescale Semiconductor - KVM on Embedded Power Architecture Platforms 125.6 MB / PDF
Yoshi Tamura, Midokura - Network Virtualization 101.3 MB / PDF

Enjoy!

Video: 20th Anniversary of Linux Gallery Tour

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The Linux Foundation has put together a 20th Anniversary of Linux Gallery with a timeline and a lot of donated items from various companies and members of the Linux community. As luck would have it, I ripped this from youtube so I could repost it in webm format and noticed that in the original the metadata for the audio stream said - creation_time : 1970-01-01 00:00:00. While that isn't quite true for Linux, which was started in 1991, it is basically the Epoch time considered to be the start of the UNIX universe. :)

If you can't play it in your browser, you can download it here:
20th_Anniversary_of_Linux_Gallery_Tour.webm (29 MB, ~6 min)

Opinion: How is Linux doing?

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Our friend Ed Dunnigan wrote saying:

It is my impression the Linux users and Distros are sitting on our hands. We seem to have arrived.

I wonder how many new Linux users are out there now? I pull down three Linux Users Groups and it has been a long long time since I saw a new user asking questions. I have been using Linux since about '95 or so, and with my aging problem (memory loss) I always learned a lot at users group meetings. Now it seems to me the recent presentations I have noted are very specialised. Not the general subject about Linux.

Have we, The Linux Community, given up trying for new users?

I'll give my response and I encourage everyone to reply with theirs too.


When does Linux turn 20?

2011 marks the 20th anniversary of the creation of the Linux kernel. But when exactly was it created? One of the first milestones we have was the original comp.os.minix newsgroup posting that Linus wrote announcing his unnamed new OS. Here's a recreation of that posting:

Newsgroups: comp.os.minix
From: torvalds@klaava.Helsinki.FI (Linus Benedict Torvalds)
Date: 25 Aug 91 20:57:08 GMT
Subject: What would you like to see most in minix?

Hello everybody out there using minix - I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones. This has been brewing since april, and is starting to get ready. I'd like any feedback on things people like/dislike in minix, as my OS resembles it somewhat (same physical layout of the file-system (due to practical reasons) among other things).

I've currently ported bash(1.08) and gcc(1.40), and things seem to work. This implies that I'll get something practical within a few months, and I'd like to know what features most people would want. Any suggestions are welcome, but I won't promise I'll implement them :-)

Linus (torvalds@kruuna.helsinki.fi)

PS. Yes - it's free of any minix code, and it has a multi-threaded fs. It is NOT protable (uses 386 task switching etc), and it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks, as that's all I have :-(.

So that post was sent out on August 25 but it is obvious that Linux has been around for a while... since April... but when was it started? I'm sure a better history is documented somewhere. I guess I'll break out one of my copies of Just for Fun and see if I can find it.

I'm not even sure at what point working name was changed from Freax to Linux. Note that in Linus' post, he doesn't give it a name. I welcome comments from others on what they remember! I started using Linux a little late myself... in January of 1995.

Oh... and it sounds like a good reason to have a party... but when and where? Anyone?

Video: The Linux Foundation - Imagine if Software was like a car!

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This is a quick video from The Linux Foundation. It is just a little over one minute long and compares Operating Systems to cars.

An Application Dock for Linux

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I am a PC, Mac, and Linux user. At night I dual boot between Vista and Ubuntu and during the day I use a Mac almost exclusively. As a result, there are many things I like about using my Mac at work and would not mind seeing them on my home desktop. Since buying a Mac right now for personal use is out of the question I have to make do with what I already have. At any rate, one of the Mac features I actually like is the Dock.


Why I Use Ubuntu

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If you are reading this it is because I finally got around to taking Scott up on his request for Ubuntu content. I am not a well versed Linux user and over the years have had a love/hate relationship with Linux and the open source community. My beef is not with proprietary software as much as it is with outrageous pricing and no access to the code to make it work for you. I don’t believe Microsoft or Apple are 100% evil nor do I think that Linux or open source are always the best solution for the job - nor do I think Microsoft or Apple are always the best solution.


Death of the Desktop Take II

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I wrote a rather long response to a posting I saw on Fedora Planet entitled, "Death of the Year of the Linux Desktop". I'm sharing it here as well.

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The desktop is dead? Some disagree. See this very compressed video on the "Death of the Desktop":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQzZVP1mua0

What makes someone a winner and what makes someone a loser? Linux on the desktop has tens of millions of users. While that might not be double-digit market share it is still a significant number of users. Anyone who looks at those numbers and calls them losing must have thought the game was winnable to begin with. It wasn't. FOSS does not spend hundreds of millions on advertising and billions on under-the-table deals with hardware makers... FOSS simply does not operate on the same playing field. The free hand of the market happens to be attached to a twisted arm.

In reality there aren't any winners and losers because it isn't a race. While those who are in it for money have certain ways to measure success, in FOSS you just make the best software you can and hope users will appreciate it. Of course the squeaky wheels always make the most noise and there are lots of complainers out there (see discussions on KDE 3.x vs. 4.x as an example) but that doesn't mean that vast majority of us FOSS users aren't very happy.


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